Sunday Morning Greek Blog

Greek Alphabet Chart

I’ll still continue to transliterate the Greek text in my blog posts, but for those of you who want a little bit more, here is a Greek alphabet chart, complete with transliteration, pronunciation helps, and the numerical value of each Greek letter, so you can easily tell who the antichrist is.

English

Spelling

Greek

Spelling

Capital

(Print)

Lower

Case

Translit-

eration

Pronun-

ciation

Numerical

Value

alpha

ἀλφα

Α

α

a

father

1

bēta

βητα

Β

β

b

baby

2

gamma

γαμμα

Γ

γ

g

girl

3

delta

δελτα

Δ

δ

d

dad

4

epsilon

ἐψιλον

Ε

ε or ε

e

met

5[1]

zēta

ζητα

Ζ

ζ

z

zone/adz[2]

7

ēta

ἠτα

Η

η

ē[3]

fête

8

thēta

θητα

Θ

θ

th

thin

9

iōta

ἰωτα

Ι

ι

i

machine or hit[4]

10

kappa

καππα

Κ

κ

k

kite

20

lambda

λαμβδα

Λ

λ

l

lake

30

mu

μυ

Μ

μ

m

mom

40

nu

νυ

Ν

ν

n

nun

50

xi

ξι

Ξ

ξ

x

ax

60

omikron

ὀμικρον

Ο

ο

o

hot

70

pi

πι

Π

π

p

pen

80[5]

rhō

ῥω

Ρ

ρ

r

rhyme

100[6]

sigma

(final)

σιγμα

Σ

σ

ς

s

send

this

200

tau

ταυ

Τ

τ

t

table

300

upsilon

ὐψιλον

Υ

υ

y/u[7]

book

400[8]

phi

φι

Φ

φ

ph

phone

500

chi

χι

Χ

χ

ch

loch

600

psi

ψι

Ψ

ψ

ps

rips

700

ōmega

ὠμεγα

Ω

ω

ō

tone

800[9]


[1]The Pre-Koine Greek alphabet had the letter digamma (Ϝ, value = 6) next.

[2]Some prefer the /dz/ pronunciation when the letter is in the middle of the word. The transliteration is still the same.

[3] Strong’s Concordance uses “ee” to transliterate this letter.

[4] Long like machine when it ends a syllable; short like hit when in a consonant-terminated syllable.

[5]The pre-Koine Greek alphabet had the letter koppa or qoppa (Ϟ/Ϟ, value = 90) next. Compare to Hebrew qoph:ק.

[6]When a word begins with rho, it always has a rough breathing mark (, ) unless it is a loan word.

[7] Use u when the upsilon appears in a diphthong (two vowels making one sound), but y when it stands alone or has the diaeresis over it (ϋ).

[8] Words beginning with upsilon or an initial-upsilon diphthong always have a rough breathing mark, except in the case of the name of the letter itself. This may reflect the loss of an initial /s/ sound at times (compare Gk “hyper” and “hypo” to Latin “super” and “sub”)

[9]The pre-Koine Greek alphabet had sampi (Ϡ; value = 900) as its final letter (after omega). Compare to Hebrew sin/shin: שׂ/שׁ.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: